COVID-19: From Dr. Josh Redd

Thought you might like to hear a well-reasoned, factual article from a medical specialist. Listen to the tone and tenor of the article. Pay attention to the information. Then, listen to what your brain tells you about its accuracy and truthfulness. For me…it’s nice to hear from a mature, non-hysterical, fact-based, level-headed expert.


About Dr. Josh Redd

Redd, MS, DABFM, DAAIM, is a chiropractic physician and author of the Amazon bestselling book The Truth About Low Thyroid. Dr. Redd owns seven medicine clinics in the western United States and sees patients from across the country and around the world who are suffering from challenging autoimmune, endocrine and neurological disorders. Dr. Redd also teaches thousands of health care practitioners about functional medicine and immunology, thyroid health, neurology, lab testing, and more.

He writes…

As a health care provider who focuses on working with immune-based conditions and teaches immunology to doctors across the country, I can tell you one way to improve your resistance to the coronavirus is to turn off the news.

Far more people are killed by lifestyle diseases such as cardiovascular disease, stroke, and diabetes, not to mention drug overdoses. The threat of the coronavirus is being blown out of proportion compared to far deadlier and more prevalent health conditions that you can do something about. Do you realize nearly 50,000 people in the U.S. die from the flu each year?

According to Harvard’s School of Public Health, the coronavirus is no more virulent than the annual flu. The mortality rate, estimated between 1 and two percent, is low compared to other viruses and even to some strains of the flu.

In China, deaths have impacted primarily the elderly and the critically ill. There have been no deaths among children under 9 years old. Men have had a higher fatality rate, but it is also noted that about half of the male population in China smokes versus only about 2 percent of women.

Also, a rapid test to screen sick people has since been developed, which will help with containment.

Symptoms of the coronavirus are much like other viral symptoms: Fever, cough, shortness of breath, and gut symptoms.

Now if you still want to freak out and you want information on what to do if it breaks out, here’s my thoughts:

  • Masks

As you may already know, masks are largely sold out. That’s ok, don’t freak out, as a mask is not your best defense anyway. According to infectious disease specialists and the Centers for Disease Control, standard surgical masks don’t offer much protection. The best mask would be an n95 respirator mask, however you will soon find it too hot and difficult to breathe. If you wear glasses, it will probably cause them to fog. Experts say the number of cases is too low to put yourself through the hassle of wearing one.

  • Prevention hygiene

The two best things you can do to protect yourself are to wash your hands regularly and not touch your eyes, nose, mouth, or ears. In fact, if you wear a mask its main benefit would be to prevent you from touching your face.

Washing your hands frequently is cited as the best way to prevent the spread of the virus. Consider carrying disinfectant wipes or spray bottle and paper towels to wipe down surfaces you must touch in public. Non-toxic disinfectants include white vinegar, hydrogen peroxide, or solutions made with essential oils such as thyme or tea tree.

  • Air travel

I know one woman who flies frequently for work. As soon as she gets to her seat, she disinfects the arms, buttons, and any of the reading material she might touch in the seat pocket. She also wipes down the bathroom door handles and anything she will touch in the bathroom.

Some people swear by coating the inside of their nostrils with Vaseline while in-flight. While this doesn’t combat germs, it can help protect the delicate mucus membranes from the extreme dryness inside an airplane, which in turn may help better defend you against viruses and other germs.

  • Shoring up your immune system and general health

Here is where we get to the heart of protecting yourself from all viruses, including the coronavirus. In addition to not touching your face and washing your hands regularly, your best strategy is to make sure your body’s natural defense systems are working well.

Antiviral herbs — maybe not the best option for autoimmune folks

In terms of supplements, one of the first things people go for are antiviral herbs such as echinacea, astragalus, licorice root, or maitake mushroom. These are some of the most researched nutrients that boost the immune’s system immediate response to a foreign invader such as a virus. This system is called the T helper 1 (TH-1) system.

We use a product that combines all these and more called X-Viromin™ by Apex Energetics.

However, if you have an autoimmune condition this product may cause an autoimmune flare up and make you worse. Why? People with autoimmunity can often be separated into two types of immune imbalances, TH-1 dominant or TH-2 dominant (TH-2 is the delayed immune response that creates antibodies).

This topic goes beyond the scope of this article, but if you have an autoimmune condition and find antiviral herbs make you feel worse, this could be why. If they make you feel better, by all means continue to take them.

Supplements that support your immune system without risking autoimmune flares.

There are still options to support your overall immune health without the risk of triggering an autoimmune flare. I suggest the following to help optimize health:

Essential fatty acids (EFAs): Americans are typically deficient in the vital omega 3 EFAs. Omega 3s are found in cold water fish and raw nuts. I suggest taking fish oil daily. Most people do not take enough; you should take about 3500 mg of fish oil for every 2,000 calories you consume. Most capsules contain 1,000 mg of EFAs and most Americans consume between 2000 and 3000 of calories a day. This means you need 5 to 6 fish oil capsules daily.

Vitamin D: Many Americans are deficient in vitamin D, and many people with autoimmunity have a genetic variation that makes it difficult for them to absorb vitamin D. I recommend 10,000 IU daily although dosage can vary depending on how well you absorb it, which you can test. Ideally, you will also take the fat-soluble vitamins A, E, and K as well. Remember, you must take the fat-soluble versions of these and not the vegetarian versions.

Glutathione: Glutathione is the body’s master antioxidant and vital for defense. I recommend taking glutathione daily for general support because most people are dealing with chronic inflammatory conditions, which can deplete the immune system. As we age our glutathione levels fall, so if you are over 50 you should also be taking it daily.

Glutathione is like a bodyguard, taking the bullet so cells don’t have to. This better protects cells from damage, including from the many toxins we live among. This added protection frees up your immune system to deal with things like viruses instead.

After testing various glutathione products on thousands of patients, the product we’ve had the most success with is Trizomal Glutathione. One thing to note is that the more inflammation you have or the older you are, the more glutathione your body requires, so dose until you notice an improvement in symptoms. I often recommend 10–15 ml spread out over two to three times a day.

Adrenal adaptogens. Adrenal adaptogens are well-researched herbs and minerals that help buffer the effects of stress on your body, toxins in your environment, and inflammation. Living in the modern world is chronically stressful, which can deplete your stress handling system, and thus your immunity. Adrenal adaptogens include panax ginseng, ashwagandha, holy basil, rhodiola, and eleuthero.

Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). SCFAs are compounds produced by healthy gut bacteria that play a role in many vital processes in the body, including immune function. However, many people are deficient in SCFAs because they do not eat enough plant fiber, which is needed to produce them. In addition to increasing your consumption of veggies and low-glycemic fruit, consider taking SCFAs as a supplement.

While the above are foundational building blocks, nutrients such as zinc, selenium, and vitamin C are also well known for helping combat viruses.

  • Diet

Whole foods. The best antiviral diet is going to be dense in nutrients and low in inflammatory foods. This means a whole foods diet abundant in colorful vegetables, leafy greens, healthy proteins, and healthy fats. It also means avoiding sugars, processed foods, and junk foods.

Lots of produce. Eat at least 25 grams of fiber a day of produce (mainly veggies so you don’t overdo the fruit sugar). Also, eat a wide variety of vegetables and keep changing it up. This will significantly boost your gut bacteria diversity, which is critical to immune health.

Minimal sugars and starches. Diets high in carbohydrates and sugars are enormously stressful on the body and weaken immune function, so avoid or greatly minimize all sweets and starchy foods such as breads, pasta, white rice, and pastries. Of course, you’ll want to avoid or minimize alcohol as well.

  • Lifestyle

Many people don’t realize how important their everyday lives are to their general immune health. For instance, if you’re in a chronically stressful relationship or situation, this is going to weaken your immunity and make you more vulnerable to viruses. Look for areas of chronic stress that you might be able to mitigate.

In addition to that, here are some lifestyle strategies that have been shown to help boost immune function:

Sleep! If you are worried about the coronavirus, prioritize getting enough sleep. Americans are terrible about getting enough sleep. Watch those late-night shows on Hulu some other time and go to bed earlier.

Move your body daily. If you already exercise regularly, great. If you don’t and you want to shore up your immune system, go for daily walks or swims, use the cardio equipment at the gym, or even spend some time dancing each day. Physical activity releases various hormones and chemicals that support immune function and gets the lymphatic system moving. Although any physical activity helps, high-intensity interval training is especially great for immune function. This involves pushing yourself until you feel you can’t breathe anymore, recovering, and then doing it again. Even a few minutes a day has powerful effects.

Just a word of caution: While exercise is vital, over exercising increases inflammation and weakens the immune system, so don’t overdo it.

Put your nervous system into a parasympathetic “rest and digest” state. We live in a world that constantly promotes a “fight or flight” state of the central nervous system. This is called being in sympathetic dominance. Ideally, we would more often be in a “rest and digest” state, also called the parasympathetic state.

Being in constant sympathetic dominance sabotages the brain so that it’s harder to activate the more calming parasympathetic state where healing and relaxation can happen. This has a dramatic impact on our immune system.

There are several ways to activate the parasympathetic response. The easiest is to activate the vagus nerve, the large nerve that runs between the brain and the organs. You can do this by gargling vigorously multiple times a day for a few minutes at a time, or by pressing a tongue depressor on the back of the throat to make yourself gag.

Another easy strategy is cold therapy, whether it’s a cold shower or immersion in cold water. Yes, you heard that right. Cold therapy has been shown to boost white blood cells so that you are better protected from viruses and disease. Start with a 60 second cold shower at the end of your hot shower and increase the time as you become accustomed to it.

The last simple strategy is to practice deep breathing exercises. Most of us are shallow breathers, thanks to our fast-paced and stressful lives. Regular deep breathing exercises increase oxygen to the body and activate immune enhancing qualities. For more information on cold therapy and deep breathing, check out the Wim Hof method.

 

 

First Aid Kits & Medical Kits…Types, Sizes, and Contents

The risk of injury or sickness is always present in any emergency, disaster, or grid-down situation. Think of any emergency…now, think of all the ways you can get injured or sick during that emergency. The outcome to your family can be devastating without the ability to properly care for minor and intermediate injuries and sickness. A simple infected cut on your finger could lead to sepsis and that can lead to death if not prevent and/or treated.

I have resurrected the articles where I listed the different kinds of medical/FirstAid kits, the mission for each, and their contents. It is well worth the time to read…and act on.

MEDICAL CARE: Individual First Aid Kit (BOK & IFAK) <click here>

The Individual First Aid Kit (BOK & IFAK) provides you the ability to render immediate life saving first aid to yourself, or use another person’s own kit to provide that care to them.

 

First Aid - Emergency Medical Care - Team Basic Aid Kit

MEDICAL CARE: Team Basic Aid Kit (TBAK) <click here>

the Team Basic Aid Kit (TBAK) enables you to provide in-depth first aid to your team or family members is critical when 911 or hospital care is not available or will be delayed by hours or longer.

 

First Aid - Squad Trauma Aid Kit

MEDICAL CARE: Squad/Group Trauma Aid Kit (STAK) <click here>

The Squad/Group Trauma Aid Kit (STAK) provides you the means to render emergency trauma care to one or multiple trauma victims.

 

Emergency Medical Care - Mass Casualty Aid Kit

MEDICAL CARE: Mass Casualty Aid Kit (MCAK) <click here>

The Mass Casualty Aid Kit (MCAK), is designed to provide emergency medical care to a moderate number of people who have suffered trauma injuries simultaneously.

 

Field Trauma Care Kit

MEDICAL CARE: Field Trauma Care Kit (FTCK) <click here>

The Field Trauma Care Kit is set-up for a seriously injured patient that needs emergency medical care based on a significant trauma injury in a situation where hospital care is considerably delayed or not available.

Home/Family First Aid Kit – Part #2

Medical Aid kit - part 2In Part #1 I explained the need for a Family First Aid Kit or Family Medical kit and I included a list of contents based on expected needs. This is not really a tactical or field first aid kit, more along the lines of around the home first aid kit.

< click here to read Part #1 >

Whatever it is called, this is Part #2 where I explain where I put the kit contents in the carry bag and provide a couple of tips. First, let’s go over the “mission” of this first aid kit –

“Kit shall contain ample first aid supplies to provide sufficient medical care to a wide range of home-based minor and life-threatening medical emergencies.”

Requirements and Restrictions –

  1. Assumption that professional medical transport and care facilities are within a reasonable timeframe that life-sustaining measures by family members are not required beyond 15 minutes.
  2. Must be reasonably weather proof.
  3. Must be reasonable capable of handling a drop of 3’.
  4. Supplies must be easily accessible.
  5. Supplies must be able to be grouped into logical treatment clusters.
  6. Supplies can normally be restocked within 12 hour time-frame.

It would pay you to read Part #1 before continuing. < click here to read part #1 >

Let’s move on to identifying each compartment of the carry bag…

Family Home first aid kit carry bagWhat is the general purpose of each compartment/component?

Bag Strap –

These are immediate action items to save a life. You don’t have to dig around in the bag to access these items. This is were I put the CAT.

Compartment #1 –

This compartment contains large dressings. To immediately stop bleeding if it is a matter of life of death. Otherwise, to provide dressing once a wound is cleaned and ready to be bandaged until transport to a hospital can be acquired.

Compartment #2 –

This compartment generally contains those items needed to sanitize and protect your hands from patients body fluids while cleaning their wound(s) to assess their condition.

Compartment #3 –

This compartment contains items to continue cleaning a wound and bandage it if no other treatment is required.

Compartment #4 –

This compartment contains items needed to clean a wound and apply antiseptic to keep wound(s) clean.

Compartment #5 –

General purpose compartment, mostly containing the medicine box.

Compartment #6 –

This compartment contains items to finish-up the bandaging process and secure a wounded or injured extremity.

Compartment #7 –

This compartment contains items to apply Bandiads to very minor wounds or finish-up the treatment of more serious wounds.


 

Now let’s start putting our kit’s contents into the right compartment…

Bag Strap –
  • 1 x CAT (Combat Application Tourniquet)
  • 1 x CPR barrier
Compartment #1 –
  • 1 x Israeli Bandage Battle Dressing First Aid Compression Bandage, 4 Inch
  • 1 x Dressing, 4” x 7”
  • 1 x Dressing, 7-1/2″ x 8″
  • 1 x Dressing, 11-3/4” x 11-3/4”

Compartment #2 –
  • New-Skin Liquid Bandage, First Aid Liquid Antiseptic, 1 Ounce Bottle
  • 1 x Saline Wound Wash, can, 6oz – 7oz, (Simply Saline or NeliMed)
  • 5 x Gloves (latex or vinyl), pair
  • 1 x Hand Sanitizer, bottle
  • 3 x Hand Sanitizer, wipes (Germ-X)

Compartment #3 –
  • 5 x Pads, gauze, 2×2
  • 5 x Pads, gauze, 4×4
  • 1 x Gauze, roll, 2”
  • 1 x Gauze, roll, 3”
  • 1 x Gauze, roll, 4”
  • QuikClot Advanced Clotting Sponge, 25g or 50g

Compartment #4 –
  • 5 x Antiseptic prep pads
  • 1 x BandAid Wound Wash, 6oz
  • 1 x Povidone Iodine Prep Solution, 16oz

Compartment #5 –
  • 12 x Closures, Butterfly
  • 10 x Swabs, cotton, tip
  • 5 x Safety Pins
  • Medicine box

Compartment #6 –
  • 1 x Tape, cloth, 1/2” x 10yd
  • 1 x Tape, cloth, 1” x 10yd
  • 1 x (1-1/2″ or 2”) Non-Woven Cohesive Wrap Self Adherent Bandage
  • 1 x Bandage, ACE, 3”
  • 1 x Bandage, Triangular
  • 1 x Splint, finger
  • 1 x Splint, wire
  • 1 x Emergency Mylar Thermal Blankets

Compartment #7 –
  • Band aids, 25 – 50 total, your choice
    • (5x) 5/8” x 5/8”
    • (5x) 3/4” x 3/4”
    • (5x) 1” x 1”
    • (3x) 1-1/2” x 2”
    • (3x) 1-3/4” x 3”
    • (5x) Spots
    • (5x) Fingertip
    • (5x) Knuckle
  • 1 x Progressive Medical Halo Chest Seal High Performance Occlusive Dressing (2pk)
  • 1 x Antibacterial, pain relieving, spray, (2oz – 3oz can) (Dermoplast)
  • 5 x Antibiotic ointment packets (approximately 1 gram), or tube or can (Triple antibiotic)
  • 1 x Hydrocortisone ointment
  • 1 x Aloe Vera 100% Gel 6 – 16oz
  • 1 x Adventure Medical Kits Dental Medic Kit
  • 1 x Hot or Cold Therapy Gel Pack – Reusable for Hot or Cold Therapy

So it all looks like this…

Family Home first aid kit carry bag

Family Home first aid kit carry bagYou now have a very complete home medical kit at your disposal that is easy to carry, protects the contents, stands out to be easily seen/found, and ready to go at a moments notice for almost every injury that would occur around your home. This bag can make a whole lot of difference while waiting for professional emergency medical care to arrive. It’s worth it!

For more information on medical care for emergencies, disasters, and grid-down <click here>

 

 

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without expressed written permission from AHTrimble.com
See Content Use Policy for more information.

Home/Family First Aid Kit – Part #1

Medical Aid - family first aid kitI’ve really not wanted to write this article…I mean really not. From the previous articles on first aid kits you can tell I am way more a tactical first aid kind of guy. I subscribe to that model and believe in it. However, the time has come that I go a little more conventional when talking about first aid kits. And there is good reason for it…”emergencies.”

Emergencies are the incidents that are categorized on the first level of emergency preparedness. Previously I outlined the BOK (Blow Out Kit) and the IFAK (Individual First Aid Kit) for individuals all the way up to the larger (FTCK) Field Trauma Care Kit. However, not all injuries occur in the field or during an incident so another type of first aid kit is needed…more along the lines of a home or family first aid kit. In the past I pretty much left it up to individuals to decide what to put in their home kits. Well, I that just seriously changed.

Why? As I was preparing to do a presentation the other day to a group of about 50 women I was utterly astounded by what I was seeing. I mean the various lists of kit contents was unreal. Some were regurgitation of other online lists, some were just lists of whatever was in the Walmart aisle. There were a couple that looked like someone’s random ADD thoughts. So I made the decision to work on what I thought would be the best all-round Family Home Fist Aid Kit (FHFAK).

Mission –

“Kit shall contain ample first aid supplies to provide sufficient medical care to a wide range of home-based minor and life-threatening medical emergencies.”

Requirements and Restrictions –

  1. Assumption that professional medical transport and care facilities are within a reasonable time-frame that life-sustaining measures by family members are not required beyond 15 minutes.
  2. Must be reasonably weather resistant.
  3. Must be reasonably capable of handling a drop of 3’.
  4. Supplies must be easily accessible.
  5. Supplies must be able to be grouped into logical treatment clusters.
  6. Supplies can normally be restocked within 12 hour time-frame.

The first thing that came to my mind when viewing this FHFAK was that is was not intended to be a medical supply warehouse. This kit is not meant to provide for mass casualties, not a warehouse, not meant to last for a year without being restocked, and not meant to cover every possible scenario. This was an immediate action first aid kit to be used by a family around the house.

With that being said, I still wanted this kit to work within the realm of emergency preparedness and into my layers methodology for injury and sickness. <click here to read more about that> I feel I’ve accomplished both, here’s why…

  1. The kit falls within the “emergency” category of emergencies, disasters and grid-down incidents which this website is based on.
  2. It expands past the “individual” layer of “Threat of injury or sickness” but nestles in nicely with the family layer and used on an everyday basis.
  3. The kit can also be used in any emergency, disaster and grid-down incidents as an immediate action bag or at a much lower level such as pulling a splinter from a finger.

In emergency services we referred to our “kits” as jump bags; we would grab the bag as we jumped off the fire firefighters Medical Aid jump bagengine into action. This kit is a family/home jump bag that can be grabbed whenever there is an injury within the family around the house. Same could be said if the family was camping, traveling, etc.

Man, I hope that clarifies what I envision this bag being used for. It took me a whole lot of writing to make my case and provide my vision for this bag.

Contents

First thing I had to do before simply starting to list the kit contents was to envision what kind of medical emergencies would show up at home among family members. To get that list going I used my experience from being on the fire department and a father of a family with three kids. Once I got that list of medial “emergencies” figured out, the contents list just really flowed. But, it was a jumbled mess of a list at first.

Taking the confusion and clutter out of the matter wasn’t too difficult, I just organized it in logical groups. And those groups are based on injuries I treated on the street. No, I won’t be offended if you group your supplies differently.

Once I had the contents and the groups figured out, I had to decide how to carry all of this stuff around and make it all readily accessible under stress. Now, before you chuckle that let me explain. In my early days on the fire department we carried our medical supplies in basically large plastic fishing tackle boxes. And those supplies looked all pretty and organized. However, kneeling in the street next to a vehicle accident patient as they were bleeding was a whole different story. And to make that story a lot shorter…many times we would dump the contents on the pavement so the supplies were easier to see and grab.

So my experience tells me…make this stuff easy to see and easy to grab when working under stress.

Once again I went back to what I know worked…and worked successfully for years under real-life conditions. I decided Medical responder first Aid bagon an actual medical kit jump bag. I found a used one which made it that much more Medical responder first Aid bagaffordable. The bags go by a number of different names; EMS bag, rescue bag, first responder bag, etc. I have included pictures of a number of them. There are two basic style for the most part, with and without external pockets. I like the external pocket for organizational purposes. When I start showing where I place the kit contents it will make more sense. But essentially I keep the most needed supplies in external pockets where they are easiest and quickest to get to.Medical responder first Aid bag

Example: The vinyl gloves are in an outside pocket since I probably need to get those first before providing care to the patient. Also, I want the CAT (Combat Application Tourniquet) readily accesible on the outside where I can grab it easily since I may need to stop the bleeding really quickly. The triple-antibiotic ointment is on the inside in an internal pocket because it would be needed towards the end of treatment.

A principle that I subscribe to is “severity & probability”, that is part of Risk Management. The same principle applies to the medical needs you might run into around the home. There is literally a never-ending list that we could draw-up, but practicality needs to play a role as well. Yes, we could well find ourselves in a “non-breather” situation. That would be an example of a low probability & high severity situation. While you might want to consider airways, an AED, and all other manner of medical equipment…it simply isn’t needed. Why? Remember, we are only trying to sustain life until the next level of medical care can arrive on-scene. And we placed a “within 15 minute” limitation on that. So knowing CPR would cover the need vs. expensive equipment that may never be used.

While all that extra equipment might be nice to have, it isn’t really necessary for the kit I am talking about. Example: airways…you must maintain that specialty skill (airway insertion) to be able to properly use airways such as the OPA or NPA airway devices. And realistically, if you need to use an airway, by the time you figured that out and began that procedure, the EMTs or Paramedics are probably rolling up to the front door.

Now, if you live out in the country, the mountains, or on a rural farm, you may want to consider additional equipment that require more advanced skills. That is perfectly acceptable but use commonsense and logic when assessing those issues.

Here are my groupings of medical needs/supplies–

  • Cuts & Bleeding
  • Punctures
  • Breaks
  • Wound Treatment
  • Medicine
  • Misc.
  • Equipment
  • Manuals

And here is my list of kit contents based on those medical needs –

Cuts & Bleeding –

  • 1 x CAT (Combat Application Tourniquet)
  • 1 x Israeli Bandage Battle Dressing First Aid Compression Bandage, 4 Inch
  • 1 x Dressing, 4” x 7”
  • 1 x Dressing, 7-1/2″ x 8″
  • 1 x Dressing, 11-3/4” x 11-3/4”
  • Band aids, 25 – 50 total, your choice
    • (5x) 5/8” x 5/8”
    • (5x) 3/4” x 3/4”
    • (5x) 1” x 1”
    • (3x) 1-1/2” x 2”
    • (3x) 1-3/4” x 3”
    • (5x) Spots
    • (5x) Fingertip
    • (5x) Knuckle
  • 1 x Tape, cloth, 1/2” x 10yd
  • 1 x Tape, cloth, 1” x 10yd
  • 5 x Pads, gauze, 2×2
  • 5 x Pads, gauze, 4×4
  • 1 x Gauze, roll, 2”
  • 1 x Gauze, roll, 3”
  • 1 x Gauze, roll, 4”
  • 1 x (1-1/2″ or 2”) Non-Woven Cohesive Wrap Self Adherent Bandage
  • 12 x Closures, Butterfly
  • New-Skin Liquid Bandage, First Aid Liquid Antiseptic, 1 Ounce Bottle
  • QuikClot Advanced Clotting Sponge, 25g or 50g

Punctures –

  • 1 x Fox Aluminum Eye Shield
  • 1 x Progressive Medical Halo Chest Seal High Performance Occlusive Dressing (2pk)

Breaks –

  • 1 x Bandage, ACE, 3”
  • 1 x Bandage, Triangular
  • 1 x Splint, finger
  • 1 x Splint, wire

Wound Treatment –

  • 1 x Antibacterial, pain relieving, spray, (2oz – 3oz can) (Dermoplast)
  • 5 x Antibiotic ointment packets (approximately 1 gram), or tube or can (Triple antibiotic)
  • 5 x Antiseptic prep pads
  • 1 x Hydrocortisone ointment
  • 1 x BandAid Wound Wash, 6oz
  • 1 x Povidone Iodine Prep Solution, 16oz
  • 1 x Saline Wound Wash, can, 6oz – 7oz, (Simply Saline or NeliMed)
  • 1 x Aloe Vera 100% Gel 6 – 16oz
  • 1 x Adventure Medical Kits Dental Medic Kit

Medicine –

  • Aspirin, 325mg
  • Aspirin, low dose, 81mg
  • Ibuprofen, 200mg
  • Acetaminophen, 500mg
  • 8 x Benadryl, 25mg
  • Imodium A-D Anti-Diarrheal Liquid, Mint Flavor 8
  • Laxative, Sennosides Stimulant Laxative, Maximum strength, 25mg
  • TECNU Extreme Medicated Poison Ivy Scrub, 4 oz.

Misc. –

  • 1 x Emergency Mylar Thermal Blankets
  • 1 x CPR barrier
  • 1 x Hot or Cold Therapy Gel Pack – Reusable for Hot or Cold Therapy
  • 5 x Gloves (latex or vinyl), pair
  • 10 x Swabs, cotton, tip
  • 5 x Safety Pins
  • 1 x Hand Sanitizer, bottle
  • 3 x Hand Sanitizer, wipes (Germ-X)

Equipment –

  • 1 x EMT Sheers
  • 1 x Tweezers
  • 1 x Forceps
  • 1 x Medical Forehead and Ear Thermometer (plus extra battery)
  • Ear Wax Removal Syringe, 3oz, Ribbed w/Non Slip Grip

Manuals –

  • 1 x First Aid

Next I will show you where I put each item in my bag…organization.

 

2009 - 2019 Copyright © AHTrimble.com ~ All rights reserved
No reproduction or other use of this content 
without expressed written permission from AHTrimble.com
See Content Use Policy for more information.