MFJ 4230MV Compact 25a Power Supply

MFJ-4230MV COMPACT SWITCHI love mobile radios! So far I have –

  • Yaseu FT-8800R
  • Yaesu FT-8900R
  • Yaesu FT-897D
  • Yaesu FT-2900R

Told you I like mobile radios! And yes…I like Yaesu brand mobile radios a whole lot as well.

But, having all these mobile radios I need to be able to power them when I am outside of the truck. And the only commonsense way to o that is with stable and readily available AC power from the utility company. But, a little tiny bit of a problem…the radios all run off of 12vDC power.

OK, so it is really no problem at all…you just use a power supply. Technically it is a “transformer” if my memory serves me right. You are taking 120vAC voltage -and through the magic of electronics- transforming it into 12vDC power. And that DC power can be used to run your mobile radios without a vehicle battery.

As always…my mission statement –

“Provide clean, stable, reliable DC power from an AC power source to run one or more mobile radios.”

Requirements and Restrictions –
  • Must not induce “noise” into the radio on any band above an acceptable (minimal) level.
  • Must be able to work continuously for years at a time without being turned off.
  • Should generate minimal heat when in stand-by.
  • Should generate manageable heat when being used continuously.

Well, here is the deal…I had already been using an MFJ SWR meter and I liked it a lot. My first power supply was from Radio Shack and it performed really well and I had no complaints. However, it just didn’t push enough amps for my new usage requirements. So I naturally looked to MFJ for a power supply option. I did my research and the 4230MV unit appeared to meet all my needs/demands. Then ti was time to do my research.

I carefully read all the reviews I could get my hands on. I really dug into it. What became obvious to me from the beginning was a couple things:

  1. The price point was excellent. Same could be said for the price to amp comparison.
  2. Users were reporting no real “noise” on the HF or any other bands.
  3. It was one of the most compact units on the market.
Here is some technical information –
  • 30 Amps Surge (up to 5 minutes), 25 Amps Continuous.
  • 4 to 16 VDC adjustable output, detent at 13.8VDC.
  • Light weight, only 3.4 lbs/1.35kg
  • Compact, only 5″ x 2 ½” x 6″ (W x H x D).
  • Backlit meter that displays amps or volts.
  • Five-Way binding post for high current radios
  • Over Voltage protection.
  • Over Current protection with “FAULT” LED.
  • QUIET Internal Cooling Fan with “FAN” LED
  • Super Regulation, works with AC input from 85 to 135 VAC (115VAC model) or from 170 to 260 VAC (230VAC model), 47-63Hz
  • Noise <100mV. AC Line Fuse( 6.3 Amps)
Findings –

I purchased my first unit several years ago and began my testing. Let’s not make this difficult…it performed exactly as it was advertised and met 110% of my expectations. Yup…a great little unit. But, let me give you a few more details –

  1. The unit will warm up a bit when using it continuously. There is a cooling fan that will spin up initally when you turn on the unit, then shut-down. Then it will come back on at about 70 degrees. It seems to spin faster as the temp rises. There was minimal sound from the fan, no problem at all.
  2. I could detect no noise on the HF side or any other band.
  3. While the unit is rated at 25amp, it can handle 30amp surges with no problem. But, it won’t operate continuously at 30amp.
  4. I’ve seen folks who have been running this unit for 3 – 4 years with ZERO problems.
  5. I like the adjustable vDC output, gives you some nice operating capabilities.
  6. I really like the clean face of the unit. It may sound silly, but it looks very professional. And I like that look sitting there on the shelf while it is working away for me.
Summary –

A great power supply unit!!

Yeah, there are some folks who like to poke fun at MFJ from time-to-time…but don’t buy into that. MFJ has a 1-year “no matter what” warranty. And that is very reassuring and tells you how confident they are in their equipment. Think about it…if a piece of electronic equipment it going to breakdown to poor quality it will probably do so in the first 30 days, undoubtedly within the first 120 days. MFJ has your back!

Buy It !Amazon - MFJ-4230MV

 

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Joining the Portable Ham Radio Box and the Power Box together into a complete system

integrated Ham Radio Set-UpAs you know I’ve been working on a series of highly portable, field going Ham radio boxes and the portable power boxes to juice them with. This article is branching off to renewing the power to keep your Ham radio outfit up and running far beyond simply a day or two. This article is about solar power. Specifically, I will share some information about solar power from a Glowtech60 foldable solar kit.

I have already covered solar power and the recharging of small batteries powering a small radio. I did a review of a SolPad7 and Nomad7 solar recharging kits for AA and AAA batteries as well as how those little solar pads can directly charge your Baofeng UV-5RA <click here to read about that>. Those batteries of course would be powering your Baofeng UV-5RA handheld radio. But that was all about small, now is time to look at larger radios, larger power needs, and larger solutions.

Going back to the original mission that started all of this was the need for radio communications capability in the field. That mission is outlined as…

“Compact and portable radio equipment providing the ability to communicate over standard radio frequencies among family and group members.”

Once the need was identified and a mission defined, then came the power to keep it going. Yes, the portable radio box has a battery and I also wrote a very brief article about using a Nomad7 or Boulder30 solar kit to recharge that battery. But you know me…one is none, two is one, and three is a good start. The next logical step would be an auxiliary power source to keep the radio operational for a longer period of time. That means a larger battery. Since the space is limited in the radio box, that means a box that holds that larger auxiliary battery.

OK, now we are getting somewhere. That lead to my design of the auxiliary power box < click here to read more >. It more than tripled the overall amount of time that the radio would stay operational.

But, as I mentioned in the beginning of the article, it all ties together to form an integrated “system.”

Here are the system’s parts:

It is way easier to stay on the same page while explaining this system to you if I show you the pictures as we go. So here is the first picture…

Next came the field test. Everything worked as designed, as built and as tested. Yea!!!!This is the portable Ham-In-The-Box that I built for emergencies, disasters, and grid-down. The unit is wholly self-contained, including its own 14Ah rechargeable AGM battery. The radio itself will shut down at about 10vDC protecting the battery from becoming completely discharged. The next step was to build a portable power box to give the radio more operational time. The radio box is not designed to be operated sealed up. Duh! You gotta be able to access the radio. So no need to get fancy with “through-the-box” connections. Powerwerx red-dee-2 (old style) 4-way power distribution

Part of the “guts” of the radio box build was a Powerwerx Red-Dee-2 4-way connector. I wanted flexibility to plug-in what I wanted and needed. The connector handles the radio, the voltage meter, and the battery. That leaves a connection open…and therein is the flexibility that I will show you.

The portable radio box is completely stand alone from an operational perspective. Open the box, connect the antenna, and plug the battery into the power distribution gadget. Then just turn on the radio and you are ready to go to work.

8900 Portable radio box

Note: The blue tape is holding a spare fuse that is protecting the battery. There is also a spare fuse that protects the radio. I carry a spare of each with the radio just in case.

The next step is to plug in the Boulder30 solar kit to recharge the battery. Well, technically, plugging the Boulder30 into the open connection on the power distribution block will provide power to the system and excess power will charge the battery continuously. Well, continuously as long as there is sun shinning.

8900 Portable radio boxWe now have the stand-alone portable radio box up and running, plus a charging system in-place to keep it running. But we are somewhat limited in the amount of time that the radio can be operational. That operational time is directly related to the depth of charge, power reserve, which the small-ish internal battery has. That leaves us with the task of increasing the operational time, meaning that we need a larger battery, which then also means we need more charging capability. And that means the “portable power box.”

looking at the box from the left front cornerSo the next picture shows that system hooked into the portable radio box. Notice the power cable connecting the two boxes? It is still just 10guage wire but it is heavily insulated by a durable cover that is resistant to the effects of the outdoors. It is a great choice in areas whose environment will not be kind to your equipment while ensuring it get the most power from the battery to the portable radio. Yes, it has Anderson Powerpoles on each end to ensure it connects to all my radio and power equipment.

8900 Portable radioThis power box has a 35Ah rechargeable AGM battery. To protect the battery from over discharge it also has a built in Low Voltage Disconnect. Notice the power box can be completely sealed up and cables can be plugged in from the external Anderson Powerpole chassis mount.

The GoalZero Boulder30 with Guardian charge controller is now charging the power box’s 35Ah battery in the power box. However, since I have a second GoalZero Boulder30 system I can now hook up that additional system directly to the radio box rechargeable battery. Since the battery is not being used to power the radio it will come back up to full charge rather quickly given adequate sun.

Here is a picture of just the heavy power cable. For the information on how I built the heavy power cable from a set of jumper cables you can < click here to read the article >

Heavy Solar Power CableHeavy power Cable with Anderson Powerpoles for radioAll right, we now have hooked up the portable radio to the portable power. You have the Boulder30 charging the portable radio box’s battery. Here is a suggestion and the reasoning behind the suggestion. I suggest you run the portable radio from the portable power box. You can be charging both batteries as you normally would. But, by not using the battery in the portable radio box it allows the Boulder30 to concentrate on recharging the battery in the portable radio box.

Why is that important? Because you never know when you might have to “run” and you might have to leave some equipment behind due to time constraints. By keeping the portable radio box’s battery fully charged you know you will have several hours of radio operating time even if you had to leave the portable power box and solar kits behind.

But don’t worry about connecting all the solar kits and the boxes, just follow this guide:

  1. Set-up the portable power box and plug in the solar charging kit into the “input” side of the portable power box. You should see the voltage meter reading a combination of the battery charge and the solar panel voltage input. As long as that voltage doesn’t start dropping you are charging the battery or at least staying even with the charging vs. usage.
  2. Set-up the portable radio box like you normally would. But, this time don’t plug in the radio to the Red-Dee-2. Set-up your solar charging system and plug that solar system into the open connector on the Red-Dee-2. You should see the voltage meter reading a combination of the battery charge and the solar panel voltage input.
  3. Now, take your heavy power cable and plug it into the portable power box. Take the other end and plug it into the radio connector in the portable radio box. You radio should be ready-to-go while running the radio off the portable power box battery.

The next picture will now show how to keep the portable power box’s battery charged up with a larger solar system, the Glowtech60 solar kit plugged into it. The Glowtech60 power cable connects to the power box via the chassis mount connection block on the side of the portable power box. The Glowtech60 system has double the charging wattage that the GoalZero Boulder 30 system has. This will allow you to keep the power box up and running far more easily.

Ham In The Box powered by batteries and solarAnd there is one last benefit from using the Glowtech60 system to charge the power box…I freed up the second GoalZero Boulder30 panel and charge controller. I can use it to daisy chain to the radio battery giving it 60w total charging capability. Or, I can use the second Boulder30 on another battery that is in need of charging.

NOTE #1: Yes, the portable power box “input” connections can also take the standard AC battery charger. I designed a special set-up to allow your battery charger to recharge the battery directly without taking the battery out of the portable power box. Please make sure you are using a high-quality battery charger designed to work with a AGM battery. Not all battery charges are designed to do so. I would suggest NOT using your AC battery charger while the power box is hooked up to and running the radio.

You may choose to have a system that you have designed, or maybe someone else’s design. But I hope this article has given you plenty to think about and put a thought or two into your head concerning what solar/power/battery capability and options are right for your needs.

Remember, communications is one of the primary faults that exists in virtually any disastrous incident where people are injured or killed while working in emergency and disaster situations. You have the power to overcome all, or at least part, of those communications issues rather simply and cost effectively should you so choose. I hope you  choose to.

And, if you haven’t already figured it out yet for what comes next…a BIG portable power box. Yup, the power box you see above I refer to “mini-me.” Its big brother is in the works and the article will be out fairly soon so stay tuned in.

Related Articles –

 

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My Truly Portable Power Box (Update – October 2015)

Truly Portable Power Box UpdateLast July I wrote about a “power box” project that I felt added a lot of capability and versatility to by Ham Radio operations. And I expanded it to give me great capabilities in other areas of prepping as well. Well, here are couple of those ideas for you to consider.

If you haven’t read the original 2-port article I would suggest you do. It will give you the background of w the power box can do and how it was designed and built.

truly portable poer boxI started with the basic “truly portable power box” and decided to test it on what has become a primary use…charging my portable handheld radios.

I hadn’t considered it for that purpose originally. I planned on using the larger power box for that mission. However, I thought I might this much smaller box out to see if it could do portable power box charging 2 baofeng radiosthe mission for just two handhelds. Recharging two handhelds would really be a big help for a limited “need” event. Why two? One for me and one for my wife. Or, one for me and one for my camping buddy. The result was extremely good!

First thing I did was top off the power box battery charge to 13.2v. Then I hooked up a dual cigarette adapter cable to the box. Cables dual cigarette

Then I hooked in the 12vDC vehicle adapter for the Baofeng UV-5R charging cradle. Next I hooked the charging cradles up to the adapter. Everything was looking good, nothing burning up, no blown fuses.

I had earlier completely discharged two 1800mAH radio batteries to give it a fair test. So I went ahead and popped the radios in the chargers. Three hours later I had two completely charged handheld radio batteries. Considering that in testing the same batteries took 2 – 3 hours charging on AC power, I felt like it was a complete success. Now I have proven that I can charge my handhelds from my truly portable power box giving me more flexibility in my radio operations. And, I only brought the charge on the batter from 13.2v down to 12.7v.

Well, then it came time to bring the battery charge back up to full. I already had my Glowtech60 set-up from some previous testing, I figured I would just hook it up and top off the battery. But then I started thinking…

I love flexibility and multiple options for everything, it’s called redundancy. Some might call it OCD 🙂

So I tried to figure out all the different ways I could charge up that power box using my solar options. And one stuck out to me that I hadn’t actually tried and tested . No time like the present!

Cables - cigarette adapterSo I gathered up my SolPad7 solar charger.My SolPad7 has a 12vDC outlet to the charge controller. It also came with a cigarette style adapter/outlet. Then I made a quick cigarette adapter cable and started connecting the equipment. SolPad7 & Power Box connection

At this point all that was left to do was plug the SolPad7 into the power box and see what happens.

I took a reading on the power box, 12.7v. I plugged in the SolPad7 in a sunny location and recorded the time, 11:00am.

I went back later, 1:00pm, and it was showing 12.8v.

Yo might be saying that it only went up .1v (1/10th of a volt) but that is OK with me. Notice the size of the SolPad? A mere 7″ x 10″ area, 70 square inches. And a maximum of 7w. I’ll take it!

Why? Because it gives me that much more flexibility that I didn’t have before.

SolPad7 & Power Box configuration

 

Related Articles –

 

 

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Yaesu FT-8800R Ham Radio : Storing and Case

Yaesu FT- 8800R ham radioIn this post I will go over how I store my 8800R and what I store with it.

In two previous articles I went over the Yaesu FT-8800R radio and accessories. Both articles are worth the read:

Yaesu FT-8800R Ham Radio – Part #1
Yaesu FT-8800R Ham Radio – Part #2

So let’s go over my standard format, what is the mission for all of this?

 

Mission –

To safely store the radio and all components with which to operate the radio.

Requirements & Restrictions –
  1. Cases must be sturdy, at least to military specifications.
  2. Cases musty protect against dust, dirt, and water impingement.
  3. Cases should protect the contents against damage due to reasonable heights and rough handling.
  4. Cases should be low profile and not draw attention to them.
  5. Case should be light enough for one person to easily carry.

SKB i-series 3I-1711--68-C.The case I chose was the SKB i-series 3I-1711–68-C. These cases are waterproof and as sturdy, if not more so, that Pelican cases. And they are cheaper that Pelican cases. They come with “cubed” foam ready to be cut to size for your equipment.

 

 

SKB iSeries hard case for a yaesu ft-8800r

 

So this is what my case looks like for my Yaesu FT-8800R.  The case is clearly labeled for easy identification.

SKB i-series 3I-1711--68-C for the Yaesu FT-8900RYaesu FT-8800R Radio Case –

Bottom Level:

  • 1 x Power supply, AC, 19amp
  • 1 x Mounting bracket, radio
  • 1 x Microphone, MH-48
  • 1 x Radio, Yaesu FT-8800R

 

SKB i-series 3I-1711--68-C for the Yaesu FT-8900RMiddle Level:

  • 1 x Power cord, AC

 

 

 

 

SKB i-series 3I-1711--68-C for the Yaesu FT-8900RTop Level:

  • 1 x 5′ Power extension cable, Anderson Power Poles on both ends
  • 3 x packages various mounting screws.
  • 1 x Mounting bracket, remote head
  • 1 x RT Systems Programming CD
  • 1 x RT Systems Programming cable
  • 1 x Power cable, Anderson Power Poles to hard soldier connection (AC power supply)
  • 1 x Cable, radio head to radio body
  • 2 x Fuses, 15amp

On top of the radio I place a 8800 user’s manual in a 1-gallon Ziplock bag with the latest copy of the US Amateur Radio Bands chart.

I have given you a list of the equipment needed to run the Yaesu FT-8800R Ham radio. Is it everything you might need?  This was meant strictly for the radio equipment itself and the essential equipment to get it going.

Take this list and use it as a starting point for your specific need and mission.

 

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Yaesu FT-897D Ham Radio : Storing and Cases

Yaesu FT-897DIn this post I will go over how I store my 897D and what I store with it.

In two previous articles I went over the Yaesu FT-897D radio and accessories. Both articles are worth the read:

Yaesu FT-897D Ham Radio – Part #1
Yaesu FT-897D Ham Radio – Part #2

So let’s go over my standard format, what is the mission for all of this?

 

Mission –

To safely store the radio and all components with which to operate the radio in HF mode.

Requirements & Restrictions –
  1. Cases must be sturdy, at least to military specifications.
  2. Cases musty protect against dust, dirt, and water impingement.
  3. Cases should protect the contents against damage due to reasonable heights and rough handling.
  4. Cases should be low profile and not draw attention to them.

SKB i-series 3I-1711--68-C.The case I chose was the SKB i-series 3I-1711–68-C.. These cases are waterproof and as sturdy, if not more so, that Pelican cases. And they are cheaper that Pelican cases. They come with “cubed” foam ready to be cut to size for your equipment.

 

So this is what my pair of cases looks like for my Yaesu FT-897D –

SKB i-series 3I-1711--68-CYes, there are two cases for my 897D. One for the radio and equipment, and the other I call “support.” Each case is clearly labeled for easy identification.

Yaesu FT-897D Radio Case –SKB i-series 3I-1711--68-C Yaesu FT-897D layer 1

Bottom Level:

  • 1 x 6′ Cable, power harness with 25amp auto fuzes, radio connector on one end, Anderson Power Poles on the other end.

 

 

SKB i-series 3I-1711--68-C Yaesu FT-897D layer 2

Top Level:

  • 1 x Yaesu FT-897D radio with AT897 Autotuner attached
  • 1 x Microphone, Yaesu MH-31
  • 1 x Cable, Data, 14″
  • 1 x Cable, Antenna, 12″
  • 1 x Cable, power, 35amp auto fuze, battery clamps on one end, Anderson Power Poles on the other end.

 

On top of the radio I place a 897D user’s manual in a 1-gallon Ziplock bag and in an other 1-gallon Ziplock bag I place a user’s manual for the autotuner and the power switch as well as a latest copy of the US Amateur Radio Bands chart.

Yaesu FT-897D Support Case –Yaesu FT-897D support hardcase contents

Bottom Level:

  • 1 x Wire antenna, 4:1 Balum, Buxcomm B2KC41
  • 1 x Lead PL-239, 50′

 

 

Yaesu FT-897D support hardcase contentsMiddle Level:

  • 1 x PL-259 male/male connector
  • 1 x PL-259 male/female connector with ground connector
  • 1 x ground wire pipe/stake clamp

 

 

 

Yaesu FT-897D support hardcase contentsTop Level:

  • 1 x Power Supply, AC, 30amp, MFJ-1230MV
  • 1 x Power Supply, AC power cord
  • 1 x Screwdriver, phillips head
  • 1 x Headphones, Yaesu YH-77sta with adaptor
  • 1 x RT Systems Programming CD
  • 1 x RT Systems Programming cable
  • 1 x power cable, 6″, Anderson Power Poles to eyelets

 

I have given you a list of the equipment needed to run the Yaesu FT-897D Ham radio. Is it everything you might need? No, it isn’t. I didn’t include the little things like some 550 Paracord to string up the antenna. I didn’t include the battery or solar panels. This was meant strictly for the radio equipment itself.

Take this list and use it as a starting point for your specific need and mission.

 

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EMERGENCY MEDICAL CARE: Part 7 – Field Trauma Care Kit (FTCK)

Field Trauma Care Kit There may come a time when your family or group falls into a situation where standard first aid just won’t do it, maybe not even advanced first aid.  You may well find yourself in the need for extensive medical care delivered in the field.

The Field Trauma Care Kit is set-up for a seriously injured patient that needs emergency medical care based on a significant trauma injury in a situation where hospital care is considerably delayed or not available.  Alternatively, the FTCK is a serious first aid kit contained in an easily transportable pack.  Say, medical care in a 72-hour kit form.

In the last post EMERGENCY MEDICAL CARE: Mass Casualty Aid Kit (MCAK) I covered a kit containing medical supplies to provide dressings and bandaging to large numbers of people who suffered traumatic injuries.  The Field Trauma Care Kit is used for a seriously injured patient that needs emergency medical care based on a significant trauma injury in a situation where hospital care is considerably delayed or not available.

Mission of the FTCK –

Provide the following to seriously injured (trauma) single individual:

  • Stop extensive bleeding, and,
  • Provide for the cleansing, debridgement, suturing and initial external antibiotic treatment to a wide variety of wounds, and,
  • Stabilize a patient until hospital level care is available.

Carry Method –

I am not tied to a particular brand or model pack. This pack is a reasonably priced (under $40) sturdy pack. Be careful of using too large of a pack. You will tend to want to fill every corner of a large pack until it is too bulky and/or too heavy to reasonably carry for any length of time or over any distance. Carry what you need but no more. Fully loaded with all kit contents the pack weight  is approximately 11 pounds. A major convenience feature is the pack’s main compartment opens completely and lays flat for full access to all items in that compartment.

Fieldline Surge Tactical Hydration PackFieldline Surge Tactical Hydration Pack Features –

  • Large padded main compartment with full zipper opening
  • 2-Liter hydration reservoir included
  • MOLLE System on front compartments
  • Top heavy duty grab handle
  • Roomy secondary compartment with 3 internal pockets
  • Small top front pocket with zipper closure
  • Lower front pocket with organizer
  • Velcro name tape and patch holders
  • Adjustable shoulder strap system with sternum slider
  • Waist belt
  • Side compression straps to balance packed gear
  • Bottom compression straps
  • Dual left and right hydration hose ports
  • Quick access 2-Liter hydration reservoir pouch
  • Fully adjustable “S”-shaped shoulder straps with 3D nylon mesh padding
  • Dimensions: 17.7″ x 9.25″ x 6.89″

Medical Kit Contents List :

Front – Top Compartment
  • 1 x pair of EMT sheers
  • 1 x Kelly Forceps 5.5″ Straight
  • 6x Germ-X Hand Sanitizer
Front – Lower Compartment
  • 2 x Dressing, First Aid, Field, 4” x 7” NSN 6510-00-159-4883
  • 5 x Bandage, Gauze, Stretch, 2” x 75”
  • 1 x Bandage, Ace, 3”
  • 1 x Tape, Medical, Cloth, 1 ½”
  • 15 x Pairs, Gloves, Medical
  • 2 x Asherman Chest Seal
Main Compartment

Interior Mesh Compartment

  • 22 x Closure, Butter Fly
  • 7 x Sutures, 4-0 USP, Silk, Black Braided, 18” with Needle (reverse cutting, 19mm)
  • 1 x Stapler, Skin, Disposable, with 35 Wide Staples
  • 1 x Staple Remover
  • 1 x Tube Super Glue

Interior Zippered Compartment

  • 1 x Kelly Forceps, Curved, 7”
  • 1 x Kelly Forceps, Curved, 6”
  • 1 x Kelly Forceps, Curved, 5 ½”
  • 1 x Kelly Forceps, Curved, 5”
  • 1 x Kelly Forceps, Straight, 8”
  • 1 x Kelly Forceps, Straight, 6”
  • 2 x Kelly Forceps, Straight, 5 ½”
  • 1 x Forceps, Sponge, 7”
  • 1 x Scissors, Surgical, Blunt, 6 ½“
  • 1 x Scissors, Surgical, Blunt, 4 ½“
  • 1 x Scissors, Surgical, Pointed, 4 ½“
  • 1 x Tweezers, Stainless Steel, Straight, Heavy Duty, 4 ¼”
  • 1 x Tweezers, Stainless Steel, Straight, Light Duty, 4 ¼”
  • 1 x Tweezers, Stainless Steel, Curved, Light Duty, 4 ¼”
  • 1 x Scalpel Handle, Large
  • 1 x Scalpel Handle, Medium
  • 25 x Scalpel Surgical Blades

Main Compartment

  • 2 x 6oz Bottles Wound Wash, Antiseptic/Anesthetic, Band-Aid
  • 2 x 6oz Cans Wound Wash, Sterile Saline, Spray, Pressure, NeliMed
  • 2 x 2oz Cans Triple Antibiotic, Spray, Pressure
  • 1 x 8oz Providone – Iodine, Antiseptic
  • 40 x Sponges, Gauze, 4”x4”, Sterile
  • 1 x Dressing, First Aid, Field, 11-3/4” x 11-3/4”, Sterile NSN 6510-00-201-7425
  • 2 x Dressing, First Aid, Field, 7-1/2” x 8”, Sterile NSN 6510-00-201-7430
  • 1 x Dressing, Trauma Wound, 6”, Sterile, (a.k.a. Israeli Battle Dressing) : NSN# 6510-01-492-2275 – Performance Systems

Detailed Content List and Pack Compartment

Front-Upper Compartment –Fieldline Surge Tactical Hydration Pack – Field Trauma Care Kit (FTCK)

  • 1 x pair of EMT sheers
  • 1 x Kelly Forceps 5.5″ Straight
  • 6x Germ-X Hand Sanitizer

EMTsheers

 

EMT sheers : A type of scissors used by paramedics and other emergency medical personnel to quickly and safely cut clothing from injured people.

Forceps1

Kelly Forceps, straight :

5.5 inch Straight Kelly Forceps made of stainless steel. A handheld, hinged instrument used for grasping and holding objects. Forceps are used when fingers are too large to grasp small objects or when many objects need to be held at one time while the hands are used to perform a task.

GermXwipes

 

Germ-X Wipes : Kills 99.99% of Germs. Used for sanitizing hands or surfaces such as around wound areas.   No, I don’t believe in bottles of hand sanitizer for a medical kit, they leak.

 

Fieldline Surge Tactical Hydration Pack – Field Trauma Care Kit (FTCK)

 

Front-Lower Compartment –

  • 2 x Dressing, First Aid, Field, 4” x 7” NSN 6510-00-159-4883
  • 5 x Bandage, Gauze, Stretch, 2” x 75”
  • 1 x Bandage, Ace, 3”
  • 1 x Tape, Medical, Cloth, 1 ½”
  • 15 x Pairs, Gloves, Medical, Nitrate
  • 2 x Asherman Chest Seal

Dressing for TBAK

Dressing, First Aid, Camouflaged, 4” x 7” : This bandage is classified as a small for wounds such as gunshot or cuts smaller than 6” in length They come with 2 ties and safety pins.

 

Gauze 2" x 5"

 

Bandage, Gauze, Stretch, 2” x 75” : Highly absorbent gauze roll is non-linting and ravel free to keep the wound site clean. Unique knit construction offers proper compression without constriction. Self-adhering; stays in place with minimal taping. Conforms to difficult body contours. Sterile bandages are packed in peel-open poly pouches for aseptic handling.

 

Ace Bandage - Medical Care - Squad Trauma Aid Kit

Bandage, Ace, 3” : ACE Brand Elastic Bandages are designed to provide support and compression during recovery and return to activity. They are comfortable to wear for extended periods of time, easy to use, and adjustable for a custom fit. Odor resistant, hook closure enables the bandage to be wrapped easily and secured without clips. Bandage retains elasticity after repeated use and washings.

MedicalTape

Tape, Medical, Cloth, 1 ½” : Cloth Adhesive, latex-free, hypoallergenic tape. Offers strong, reliable adhesion. Comes with durable backing resistant to tearing and stretching. Adheres well to tubing and skin. Not made with natural rubber latex.

 

GlovesNitrile2Gloves, Medical, Nitrate : Nitrile exam gloves are the ideal solution for individuals sensitive to rubber latex and/or donning powder. They contain no allergy causing natural rubber proteins. Nitrile features extraordinary strength and puncture resistance while maintaining tactile sensitivity. Nitrile does not tear as easily as vinyl and feels more natural than both latex or vinyl. These gloves are FDA 510k registered and meet or exceed all current FDA regulations.

 

ACS Asherman Chest Seal

Asherman Chest Seal : Rusch Asherman Chest Seal is a safe approach to treating open pneumothorax and preventing tension pneumothorax in chest injuries from gunshot, stab wounds or other penetrating chest trauma. The unique one-way valve is designed to let air and blood escape while preventing re-entry of either. The ACS is standard issue for the U.S. Army and the U.S. Navy.

 

Fieldline Surge Tactical Hydration Pack – Field Trauma Care Kit (FTCK)Main Compartment – Interior Mesh Compartment

  • 22 x Closure, Butterfly
  • 7 x Sutures, 4-0 USP, Silk, Black Braided, 18” with Needle (reverse cutting, 19mm)
  • 1 x Stapler, Skin, Disposable, with 35 Wide Staples
  • 1 x Staple Remover
  • 1 x Tube Super Glue Wound Closure

BandageButterfly

 

Butterfly Closures, Small or Medium : These waterproof butterfly closures are designed to close and secure small wounds and incisions, holding the skin firmly while not sticking to the wound itself. They remove the need for stitches in relatively minor cuts.

Sutures

 

Sutures, 18”, 4-0 (USP), Absorbent : Multifilament, absorbable suture, 45 cm, undyed. Needle: 19 mm, 3/8 circle, reverse cutting. Used to close properly cleaned traumatic wounds when more advanced medical care is not available.

Oasis Skin Stapler - Medical Care - Squad Trauma Aid KitStapler, Skin, Disposable, with 35 Wide Staples : The Oasis wide skin stapler is affordable and simple. It fits comfortably in your hand to enhance control of skin closure and also reduces surgery time. Lever action staplers are the most popular design on the market, along with a distinctive staple shuttling feature greatly reduces track friction, a primary cause of jamming. Other features include a short trigger stroke for ease of use and nonstop feed, angled head allows visibility of incision to ensure precise staple placement during operation, arrow indicator assists in accurate staple alignment. Staple count indicator allows you to view staples remaining to help minimize waste. Staple lines are more likely to prevent leakage of blood or air. Wide Staples measure 6.5mm x 4.7mm.

Oasis Staple Remover - Medical Care - Squad Trauma Aid KitStaple Remover : Versatile stapler remover allows for fast and easy removal of surgical skin staples with minimal discomfort to the patient.   Versatile single-use skin stapler allows for fast and easy removal of surgical skin staples with minimal discomfort to the patient. Consistent performance by placing the metal tip of the sterile remover underneath the staple and squeezing the handles until they touch and the extractor is fully closed. Once the staple is completely reformed the remover can be lifted from the skin and the staple is removed.

 

Super Glue - liquid sutureSuper Glue Wound Closure : Yup, good old Super Glue.   There is a proper medical version for wound care, two groups:

  • Derma+flex® QS™, SurgiSeal, FloraSeal and Dermabond
  • LiquiBand®, Histoacryl, Indermil, GluStitch, GluShield

Note: If you don’t want to, or can’t, buy the full-on human medical version, don’t forget there are veterinary options.

 

Main Compartment – Interior Zippered Compartment

  • 1 x Kelly Forceps, Curved, 7”
  • 1 x Kelly Forceps, Curved, 6”
  • 1 x Kelly Forceps, Curved, 5 ½”
  • 1 x Kelly Forceps, Curved, 5”
  • 1 x Kelly Forceps, Straight, 8”
  • 1 x Kelly Forceps, Straight, 6”
  • 2 x Kelly Forceps, Straight, 5 ½”
  • 1 x Forceps, Sponge, 7”
  • 1 x Scissors, Surgical, Blunt, 6 ½“
  • 1 x Scissors, Surgical, Blunt, 4 ½“
  • 1 x Scissors, Surgical, Pointed, 4 ½“
  • 1 x Tweezers, Stainless Steel, Straight, Heavy Duty, 4 ¼”
  • 1 x Tweezers, Stainless Steel, Straight, Light Duty, 4 ¼”
  • 1 x Tweezers, Stainless Steel, Curved, Light Duty, 4 ¼”
  • 1 x Scalpel Handle, Large
  • 1 x Scalpel Handle, Medium
  • 25 x Scalpel Surgical Blades

Note: All medical instruments are self-explanatory.

Main Compartment – (in main compartment but in Ziploc bags)

  • 2 x 6oz Bottles Wound Wash, Antiseptic/Anesthetic, Band-Aid
  • 2 x 6oz Cans Wound Wash, Sterile Saline, Spray, Pressure, NeliMed
  • 2 x 2oz Cans Triple Antibiotic, Salve, Pressure
  • 1 x 8oz Providone – Iodine, Antiseptic
  • 40 x Sponges, Gauze, 4”x4”, Sterile
  • 1 x Dressing, First Aid, Field, 11 ¾” x 11 ¾” , Sterile NSN 6510-00-201-7425
  • 2 x Dressing, First Aid, Field, 7-1/2” x 8”, Sterile NSN 6510-00-201-7430
  • 1 x Dressing, Trauma Wound, 6”, Sterile, (a.k.a. Israeli Battle Dressing) : NSN# 6510-01-492-2275 – Performance Systems

BandAid Wound WashBand-Aid Antiseptic Wash : 6.0 fl oz bottle. Cleans minor cuts, scrapes & burns, relieves pain & itch and helps to prevent infection. Used to clean minor cuts, scrapes and burns by thoroughly flushing the affected area.

Recovering from an injury begins with properly cleaning a wound; the sooner the better. Germs cause infections when you have an open wound. Germs will be found on the inside and outside of the wound. They get inside from whatever object broke the surface of your skin and through migration from the skin post-trauma.

To give the victim the best chance of survival from being wounded you must properly clean the wound; which includes removing both the debris and killing the germs the best you can. And the wound cleansing generally will be accompanied by some degree of pain. This wash product has antiseptic properties to help kill germs while you are irrigating the wound washing debris out, but it also has a mild anesthetic as well. But trust me, they will still feel pain, just not as much.

NeliMed Wound Wash saline sprayNeliMed Wound Wash Saline Spray :

NeliMed is a sterile saline solution that cleanses minor wounds and scrapes without any burning or stinging. Sprays in any position, including when inverted.

This is a great product to clean a wound. It is pure saline that is under pressure. You can debridge the wound much better that using non-pressurized saline or other wound washes.

TrippleAntibiotic2

Triple Antibiotic (ointment / salve / spray) :

Triple antibiotic ointment is a topical solution containing three antibiotics – bacitracin, neomycin, and polymyxin B sulfates. It is used to prevent infection and heal wounds. The combination of antibiotics works to kill bacteria on the surface of the skin, keeping open wounds free of germs that could cause infection.

After you get the wound cleaned up, maybe sutured you still have to worry about infection. The iodine based products mentioned above go a long way towards preventing that infection by killing the germs/bacteria topically at the time of application; but they are not antibiotics.

This item is an antibiotic, and it is designed to kill bacteria that can cause infections and assists in the wound healing. This product can be used on burns as well to help prevent infection. And don’t be an idiot…DO NOT TAKE THIS PRODUCT ORALLY !

Providone - Iodine

 

Providone – Iodine, Antiseptic : When tending to a wound or preparing the skin before minor invasive procedures, it is important to properly disinfect and cleanse the area. Povidone Iodine Ointment kills germs efficiently. Health-care antiseptic for preparation of the skin prior to surgery. First aid antiseptic to help prevent infection in minor cuts, scrapes and burns. Active ingredient: Povidone-Iodine, 10 % (equivalent to 1% titratable iodine).

GauzePads

 

Sponges, Gauze, 4” x 4”, Sterile : Rayon and polyester blend is ideal for applying ointments, prepping or cleaning. Highly absorbent. Packed in sterile, patient-ready envelopes.

 

Dressing, First Aid, Camouflaged-11

 

Dressing, First Aid, Field, 11 ¾” x 11 ¾” : This bandage is classified as a medium for larger wounds such as intestinal or larger areas of burns, etc. Dressing comes with 4 ties and are very absorbent (1 unit of blood).

Dressing 8" - Medical Care - Squad Trauma Aid Kit

Dressing, First Aid, Field, 7 ½” x 8”, Sterile : This bandage is classified as a medium dressing used for larger wounds. Has four cloth tails.

 

BandageIsraeli4b

 

Dressing, Trauma Wound, 6” (a.k.a. Israeli Battle Dressing) : This bandage is classified as a medium for larger wounds such as intestinal or larger areas of burns, etc. This bandage can be applied with one hand, has an easy securing device, and can be used as a tourniquet.

 

Remember, without training your equipment isn’t much good. Rendering medical care, especially trauma care, isn’t easy unless you have the skills.  You gain the skills through training.  Get training!

This medical kit (FTCK) can provide very good care for trauma victims in the field. There is a lot of capability here that can save lives. This is a great kit for use when you family is far from main-stream medical care.  It can also be an amazing life-saver during a disaster or especially during grid-down.  Prepare, save lives, and repeat.

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Training is the most important part of any First Aid Kit!

 

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