Prepper Myth #10: “My Bug Out Plan”

This is one of a series of posts on some commonly held prepping beliefs, and reasons why they may be wrong and possibly dangerous to you and your loved ones.

Their Myth Reasoning (not me talking/writing) – If there is something that forces us to leave, we’ll grab the BOB’s and other gear and load the stupid people - stupid planstruck. We’ll then head to one of our locations and keep an eye on the situation. If something happens that would force us to walk, we have a wagon and would find a shopping cart nearby as well. In the winter we have a couple children’s sleds we could load up and tow behind us.

My Opinion – First, this is not “my” plan. It is the plan of a so-called prepper expert giving advice under the guise of dispelling “myths.”

Second, Any “plan” that starts out with “if” is no plan at all. Then he does it again, “If something…” This guy obviously has no plan at all and simply plans on “winging it.” And he will fail. And then talking about having a wagon and finding a “shopping cart.” This is how the guy plans on bugging out with his family? Riiiiight!shopping cart as a bug out vehicle

Come on, I can’t get most shopping carts to work right in the grocery store. How is this guy going to load it down with his bug-out gear and travel down the road, let alone cross-country?

Then he goes all nostalgic on us by talking about loading up kid’s sleds in the winter and heading out. And how much can a sled hold on those skinny little metal rails? And does he plan on bugging out only when there is snow on the ground for the sleds?

Come on! This guy has no clue whatsoever on a plan, bugging out, or the slightest idea to even begin solving the problem. But the real problem is, he is trying to act the expert giving advice to less informed folks. But the way I see it, you will die along with your family if you follow his advice and example.

If you are going to develop a plan…make it REALISTIC! And then test it under real conditions to see if your plan will work.

 

 

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Prepper Myth #9: Your BOB Needs to be as Light as Possible

This is one of a series of posts on some commonly held prepping beliefs, and reasons why they may be wrong and possibly dangerous to you and your loved ones.

Note: Myths 5 – 10 were taken from a post by a so-called prepper expert providing advice while dispelling “myths” about prepping and bugging out. I thought the advice to be so outrageously idiotic and dangerous that I felt the need to respond to this guy before he gets people killed.

 

 

Their Myth Reasoning (not me talking/writing)  There have been more posts and comments about this than any of the other myths. Anytime someone makes a forum thread and shows their BOB, there are always people who make a comment like “Good luck carrying that”. I always wonder where these scoffers are planning on bugging out to. Me? I plan on driving. If there is some type of event that keeps me from driving, I can think of five ways to carry my BOB and other gear as well.

Maybe they plan on heading to the deep woods? For 95% of people, that is a bad idea. Even if you are a primitive skill master and can make do with a knife and a dirty look, what about your family?

Since the events that you actually need to bug out for are severe and you don’t know when you’ll be able to go home, what will you do in the woods when your supplies run out?

My thoughts are that if I do have to bug out there is a pretty serious reason. Since I don’t know how long I might need to be away, I want to make sure I have enough gear to take care of my family. I’m more concerned with making sure I have what we need than I am with the weight of the pack. On the very slim chance I can’t drive and have to carry it, I can find five means to negate the weight.

My Opinion –  Well-intentioned but horrible reasoning and advice. This guy is showing his utter lack of understanding of the most basic of preparedness concepts.

First, if you are going to drive, then there is no “BOB”, there is a BOV (Bug Out Vehicle). But he keeps referring to a BOB, as in “bag”, so he is way off base once again.

Second, Then he makes fun of those that comment on the bag’s weight when referring to people who challenge him on the weight. Well, those folks are 100% right and the “adviser” is 100% wrong. If you must carry a BOB, which is the whole underlying premise, then weight means everything. Actually, the concept of “weight and space” means everything. A concept that this so-called adviser is unaware of. Which then leads me to believe that this adviser is a novice at best.

Third, he infers that he can negate the weight of his burdensome BOB in at least five ways, yet doesn’t mention a single one, let alone the benefits and drawbacks to each.

Fourth, He comments about being away from home for a long time and that he needs to have “enough gear to take care of my family.” But he doesn’t mention a single piece of gear that he would take, or a system/process by which to identify what gear to even consider. That is a rookie mistake, let alone poor advice. And then he makes the audacious statement that he is not concerned about the weight of his pack containing “enough gear to take care of his family.” What a mistake!

Sorry, but as I read this guys’ advice to counter prepper myths I get infuriated with him. It is this kind of “expert” that will get people killed by the droves. He may talk pretty, saying key words, feigning some level of expertise – but he is utterly void of any substantial, practical, workable advice. This guy is a danger to preppers!

 

 

 

 

 

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Prepper Myth #8: You Need a Bug Out Location (BOL)

This is one of a series of posts on some commonly held prepping beliefs, and reasons why they may be wrong and possibly dangerous to you and your loved ones.

Bug Out location mythTheir Myth Reasoning (not me talking/writing) The majority of preppers don’t own a separate piece of property that they consider their BOL. The truth is, you don’t need one. Sure, it might be ideal, but it isn’t needed. Below is a way to develop multiple locations. That way you have four routes out of your area.

First, if you have a relative or friend outside of your general area, consider asking them if you could head there. If you don’t have another location to go, I recommend finding a town that’s big enough to have a hotel but small enough to be inconspicuous, which is thirty to sixty miles away.

I say “large enough to have a hotel” because that is the landmark. If they have a room available, stay if you like. If you want to continue on, do so. Do this going north, south, east and west.

Now develop a couple different routes to each location and label the routes “1” and “2”. We purchased plastic foldable maps and have one in our BOBs and one in the vehicle. I think each car should have a map and the directions to each location. If you’re at work and your spouse is at home when you need to bug out, you can send a text or email that says “North, route 2”. Now you know where they are going and the route they’re taking to get there.

bad prepper advice on bugging out or bugging in will get you and your family killed.My Opinion –  This one is a complete mess to the point I have to disagree with the writer based on just flat-out poor advice alone.

First, the writer talks about having “four routes out of your area.” Really? Where did that magic number come from? However, he does share his wisdom by identifying the four main points on the compass; North, South, East & West. Wow, amazing planning advice!

Let’s take my situation where I live. Going west leads you into very inhospitable desert conditions. Going south leads you into just as inhospitable desert conditions plus it leads you towards the Mexican border and a very large cartel controlled city on the way there. Heading east runs you into extremely rugged granite mountains that also happen to border a highly controlled military base; and the mountains are the beginning of active bombing ranges. So would that be a good idea to plan to head those directions? Nah, not so much. So that leaves north as the primary and almost sole direction to head. But there are only two real roads that head that direction; state highway and Interstate. So what do I do?

Second, the writer makes a recommendation of the size town to head to for safety. Reality strikes! There is no town within 30 – 60 miles for me to head to. Now what? Well, the writer makes a recommendation on how to decide that decision making is not flipping a coin. high quality decision criteria is a must.the town is right for you and your family. His criteria? “…finding a town that’s big enough to have a hotel but small enough to be inconspicuous, which is thirty to sixty miles away.”

You have got to be kidding me! His decision criteria is a motel that is “big enough” but also “inconspicuous”? Sorry, my decision criteria would be more along the lines of:

  • Sufficient number of folks to adequately defend the location from a reasonable level of violence.
  • Medical facilities and at least some well-qualified medical personnel.
  • Enough self-sustaining independent water supply.
  • Capacity to grow sufficient food to be as self-sustaining as possible.
  • Non-violent to outsiders.
  • Knowing the people there well enough (or having enough skills/gear/equipment) to be welcomed.

There are additional criteria that I could identify but that list is a good start.

families must stick together when bugging out, bug out, bug-out, bugout.Then there is the audacious advice that families members should bug-out to far off locations independent of each other! This is a virtual death sentence. I can’t for the life of me imagine telling my wife to hit the road on her own during a time of crisis when the #1 threat would be violence. And violence is always the #1 threat to deal with. Now, the writer would have you believe that the same advice would be true for your kids as well? Absolutely absurd!

DOn't be an idiot when it comes to emergency preparedness.Bugging out is not a decision to be made lightly and certainly not without considerable coordination and planning. The logistics alone is daunting. And he can do as he wishes, but I will gather my family first. Because my first responsibility is to protect my family and I can’t do that if they are on the road by themselves.

This single “myth” and the idiocy of the writer’s advice is sufficient motivation for me to write a series of articles on bugging out; that is bugging out without getting you and your family killed.

 

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Prepper Myth #7: You Don’t Need an Actual Bug Out Plan

This is one of a series of posts on some commonly held prepping beliefs, and reasons why they may be wrong and possibly dangerous to you and your loved ones.

Note: Myths 5 – 10 were taken from a post by a so-called prepper expert providing advice while dispelling “myths” about prepping and bugging out. I thought the advice to be so outrageously idiotic and dangerous that I felt the need to respond to this guy before he gets people killed.

 

 

Failure to plan for bugging out will result in failure, injury and probably death. Bugout buginTheir Myth Reasoning (not me talking/writing) This is the other camp that says they won’t ever bug out and don’t need a bug out plan.  As I mentioned above, in the vast majority of scenarios, staying home or “bugging in” is a better solution. To me, this means that the events you do need to bug out for are much more serious. Events that could push me from my home are things like imminent fire, flooding, a prolonged grid down or civil unrest in an urban and some suburban areas. When do you know you should bug out? When you would be safer leaving than staying. The events I described could be extremely dangerous, so not having a plan to put in action, having BOB’s and a plan for bugging out, is equally as dangerous.

My Opinion –  Once again, I kind of agree but the logic and reasoning but the advice falls short. The writer talks about some events that would push him from his home. But he gives no rationale behind his decision. Nor, does he give you any advice on how to apply it to your situation. His advice to go is “When you would be safer leaving than staying.”

What? How is that for sound reasoning? What do you base the answer on? Do you wait until some magical answer appears to you?

PLan for bugging out and bugging in. failure to plan will bring failure and that means death or injury to you and your family.I say, make these decisions ahead of time. Identify the events, situations, or scenarios that would drive you to bug-out. Set trigger points and steps to take at each trigger point so when you are in a full-on panic mode you can still know what to do and when. In so doing, when you are at the most crucial decision point your level-headed decisions are already made for you. It is called “planning.” And those of us that have worked in high-stress, emergency, disaster, and stressful lines of work know that the worst possible time to do planning and making complex decisions is when the pressure is at its highest.

Go through a threat and risk assessment of those events that you have decided will likely affect your family. <read more> Then work through the “probability and severity” aspect of each threat. Then based on that you can design a plan to mitigate the threats and risks in logical and reasonable approach. You can take it one step at a time addressing the most urgent threat first.

So, yes, I agree with the writer on having a plan. But I feel his logic, reasoning and advice is flawed to the point it could jeopardize the safety of you and your family.

 

 

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Prepper Myth #6: BOB’s Need to Last 72 Hours

This is one of a series of posts on some commonly held prepping beliefs, and reasons why they may be wrong and possibly dangerous to you and your loved ones.

Note: Myths 5 – 10 were taken from a post by a so-called prepper expert providing advice while dispelling “myths” about prepping and bugging out. I thought the advice to be so outrageously idiotic and dangerous that I felt the need to respond to this guy before he gets people killed.

 

 

Their Myth Reasoning (not me talking/writing)  Many times BOB’s are referred to as “72 hour kits”. The purpose of a BOB should be to get you from your home to your BOL and to last a minimum of three days, or 72 hours. As I have stated above, the events that would actually force me to bug out are pretty serious. If I have to leave, there is a good chance it won’t be safe for me to return to my home in 72 hours. My point is that you might have to make do for longer than 72 hours. Keep that in mind when stocking your BOB. You don’t know if you’ll find a working ATM while you’re out so you might consider keeping cash or precious metals in your BOB so you can restock while you’re bugged out.

 

 

My Opinion –  Wow! Once again this writer shows his naivete in matters of preparedness. But let me compliment him first. He does make a clear distinction between a “72-hour kit” and a “BOB” (a.k.a. Bug Out Bag, Get Out Of Dodge bag).

In you are dealing with a temporary disaster or emergency it might be appropriate to discuss returning to our home within 72 – 96 hours. In a grid-down or any serious disaster scenario the chances of ever being able to return to your home, or even your home surviving, is slim to none. So the two scenarios are vastly different in scope and nature.

His idea about carrying cash is good…but for what? That is the point…if you are going to carry cash, what is it for…exactly what for. He doesn’t explain the risks/threats you will face at all. You have to define the mission of each piece of gear/equipment.

Why?

Because I understand the concept of identifying the mission for a piece of gear. Obviously he has failed to identify what the mission of his BOB is. Define the mission of something BEFORE you stock it. Make each piece of gear count, be complete/thorough, and then test it. The thinking a backpack BOB (Bug Out Bag) can be stocked for some extended bugging out is ludicrous.

What are the primary threats/risks that you would be facing in any “bug-out” situation?

  • Violence and threat of injury or death
  • Injury from non-violent injuries
  • No/poor communications
  • No/poor organization
  • Dehydration
  • Hypothermia or hypothermia
  • Starvation

And how do I know this? Because I have studied and understand “L.I.P.S.” <read more> which tells you what your priorities are. Then I studied and understand how to rate threats/risk and how to mitigate them <read more>.

So once again, ill-conceived…at least incomplete…advice from an obviously inexperienced, untrained so-called “preparedness expert” giving advice that will kill you and your family.

 

 

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Prepper Myth #5: You Have to Bug Out

This is one of a series of posts on some commonly held prepping beliefs, and reasons why they may be wrong and possibly dangerous to you and your loved ones.

Note: Myths 5 – 10 were taken from a post by a so-called prepper expert providing advice while dispelling “myths” about prepping and bugging out. I thought the advice to be so outrageously idiotic and dangerous that I felt the need to respond to this guy before he gets people killed.

 

Buging Out Bugging In - myth, advice, expert

 

Their Myth Reasoning (not me talking/writing) This is probably the biggest of the myths; that there are many reasons that you’ll have to bug out. The truth is that for the vast majority of scenarios, you will be safer, more secure, and more comfortable by battening down and staying home. Home is where your family feels the safest. It is where you have a routine and familiar surroundings. In dire times, those two things go a long way to uphold our mental well-being. Home is also where all of your preparations are and where you’re best suited to face the most “come, what may” scenarios.

My Opinion – I kinda agree, but there is some flawed logic they are using here. There are actually many reasons that you might have to “bug-out” depending on the scenario being discussed. The Make bug out decision based on reason and logic with a plan vs. making decisions based on emotions. emotion based decisions will get you kiled.primary determining factor is your home’s location relative to the scenario playing out. “Routine”, “feels the safest” or “familiar surroundings” don’t play into the decision to stay or leave. No, not at all. It is a matter of risk mitigation. You ask the question, “Does staying in my home vs. bugging-out increase or decrease the probability and severity of the threat that is being presented?” That’s it, it’s that simple. You don’t go off of feelings and emotions; that will get your family in a spot that could be very unhealthy.

If you don’t understand threats, risks and mitigation then you need to read <read more>. Threats boil down to two things, and only two things; the probability that an event will occur and if it does occur what is the severity of impact to your family. Once that is established then you weigh it against what you can do to reduce the probability and/or severity to a level that you feel you can adequately deal with the situation. Until then, you are making decisions by simple guesswork or worse yet, going off of emotions.

Now, I do agree that in many emergencies and disasters a “shelter-in-place” decision makes sense. But what you have to have ready is a Plan B, Plan C, etc. No matter what you have in place options and alternatives to move your family to another location for safety purposes. And trying to come up with those plans on the fly, under pressure, is not a good idea.

What I would suggest is a solid plan in advanced on what scenarios you are comfortable with sheltering in place, and what scenarios you feel warrants bugging-out. And most importantly – when and where.

 

 

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Prepper Myth #4: TEOTWAWKI will be fun!

This is one of a series of posts on some commonly held prepping beliefs, and reasons why they may be wrong and possibly dangerous to you and your loved ones.

Their Myth Reasoning (not me talking/writing) – A rarely-discussed but obvious undercurrent in survival circles is the general idea that somehow a serious survival situation will be great for those who have prepared adequately, and likely be good for the world in general. A number of justifications are given for this view: 1) It will have a cleansing effect, it will be a neat little “reset” button for society, 2) people’s priorities will improve by necessity, 3) etc. Although this issue is not discussed often, there is an obvious hoping-it-will-happen theme to the attitudes of many survivalists. Why? Because for those who have prepared, somehow things will be better than they were before SHTF. Nothing could be farther from the truth. The bottom line is that if you survive a worldwide collapse, you haven’t earned immortality – you’ve just earned the opportunity to die a later death. A death that will likely be violent but will almost be guaranteed to be painful and lingering. And it isn’t just your death that will be slow and painful – you’ll also have the experience of watching your friends and family go the same way. Culturally, we are now so many generations removed from primitive medical care that we’ve almost completely forgotten what life will be like without a professionally-staffed, well-equipped, electrified, sanitized, and heated hospital to go to when we have any sort of illness. You think appendicitis is bad with anesthesia, antibiotics, and a trained surgeon? It sure is – but now try it without any of those things. It doesn’t stop at medical care – in our culture, we have come to take for granted general security, food availability, reliable utilities, sanitation, the rule of law, human rights, access to information, and on and on. By definition, none of these things will be available in TEOTWAWKI. And if you think living in a world where none of these things exist is going to be anything other than misery, you haven’t thought very hard about what it will be like.

My Opinion – I agree. I have lived for extended periods of time in very primitive conditions and IT AIN’T FUN!!!! If you think trying to survive day-to-day from sickness, hordes, gangs, criminals, and just plain hard work, hunger and thirst, then you need a reality check. Think about how hard it could potentially be just to find enough water to drink for the day. Have you ever HAD to hunt for your meat? How about field dressing that elk or cow? How about butchering it into usable chunks of meat? Have you ever watched someone die because you can’t get them even minimal medical attention? Was it a family member?

Sure, in post-SHTF there would be moments of joy, happiness, and pleasure. But they would be minor & few compared to today but monumental in context. Yes, people in the military who are in combat grow closer together most of the time. But they also see their buddy’s arms, and legs blown off as well. That takes a huge spiritual and mental toll. Those folks in combat grow closer together to survive.

There is a reason why just 150 – 200 years ago the average life span was in the 30’s & 40’s. And then about 1000 years ago it was in the 20’s with ½ of children dying before puberty. Look around you at the people taking advanced medication or medical treatments; they will die and die rather quickly and in some cases not so pleasantly.

Post-SHTF won’t be a party, no picnics and dirty beyond belief. Prepare for SHTF but I would suggest you not romanticize it and hope for it.

How can you ease the pain? “Community!” Find and become part of a solid, conservative, Christian community. The only thing that will really ease the situation and have a hope for off-setting a true depressing SHTF scenario is a community of good people, with lots of various skills, working together. Then…you can have the hope to move from surviving to thriving.

 

 

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